Chemistry

Examples of Ethers

We explain that what are examples of ethers? The ethers are chemical compounds consisting of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. An ether consists of an oxygen atom that is attached by single bonds to carbon atoms that are part of alkyl or aromatic groups. The simplest of the ethers is dimethyl ether , also called methoxymethane.

Related Articles

Dimethyl ether: CH 3 -O-CH 3

Properties of ethers

Ethers are organic compounds that are characterized by a number of properties:

  • Solubility
  • High volatility
  • Reactivity
  • Inflammability

Solubility

Solubility is the ability of substances to physically combine with others . Ethers are soluble in water in different proportions. Ethyl ether (ethoxyethane) forms mixtures with water in different amounts. This and methyl ether (methoxymethane) are the most miscible with water. This is because its molecules meet their well-balanced chains.

High volatility

Ethers are very volatile; that is, they have boiling points lower than that of water . This causes them to become steam very easily. Sometimes it is a problem, because large amounts of vapors at room temperature have the danger of igniting at the slightest spark.

Reactivity

Ethers, when involved in chemical reactions, are capable of shedding one of their side chains, the alkyl group . This chain will be able to join anions such as halogens (Cl  , Br  ) (I  ), which are the most electronegative elements. The rest of the ether molecule will bond with a hydrogen atom to complete itself, forming an alcohol.

[CH 3 – CH 2 – O – CH 2 – CH 3 ] + HCl -> [CH 3 – CH 2 – Cl] + [CH 3 – CH 2 – OH]

Inflammability

Flammability is the chemical property of substances in which, when a spark occurs, they enter into a combustion reaction, emitting a quantity of heat and decomposing into carbon dioxide and water. Ethers are flammable, especially because of their high volatility. Ethoxyethane or diethyl ether is dangerous because its flame is transparent, and its reaction is difficult to notice.

Nomenclature of ethers

In the common name of an ether, the names of the alkyl or aromatic groups attached to the oxygen atom are written in alphabetical order , without the ending o, followed by the word ether .

Example 1:

CH 3 – O – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 3

Methyl – O – Propyl

Common Name: Methyl Propyl Ether

In the IUPAC system, an alkoxy group consisting of the smallest alkyl group and the oxygen atom is used to name an ether, followed by the name of the alkane with the longest carbon chain.

Example:

CH 3 – O – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 3

Methyl – O – Propyl

IUPAC name: 1-methoxypropane

Uses of ethers

Ethers are extremely useful chemical compounds in the field of anesthesiology . Anesthesia is the loss of all sensitivity and consciousness. A general anesthetic is a substance that blocks signals to the centers of consciousness in the brain, causing the person to experience loss of memory and sensitivity to pain , and artificial sleep .

Diethyl ether, also called ethyl ether , was the most widely used anesthetic for more than 100 years. Although easy to administer, ether is highly volatile and highly flammable. A small spark in the operating room could cause an explosion. Non-flammable anesthetics, such as foran, etran, and pentran, have been developed since the 1950s.

  • Forano (isoflurane): CF 3 – CHCl – O – CHF 2
  • Etrane (enflurane): CHF 2 – O – CF 2 – CHFCl
  • Pentran (methoxyflurane): CHCl 2 – CF 2 – O – CH 3

Most of these anesthetics retain the ether group, but the addition of many halogen atoms reduces the volatility and flammability of the ethers. In recent times, they are replaced with Fluothane (halothane) (2-bromo-2-chloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane): CF 3 -CHBrCl.

Examples of ethers

  • Dimethyl ether or methoxymethane: CH 3 – O – CH 3
  • Methyl ethyl ether or methoxyethane: CH 3 – O – CH 2 – CH 3
  • Methyl propyl ether or methoxypropane: CH 3 – O – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 3
  • Methyl butyl ether or methoxybutane : CH 3 – O – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 3
  • Diethyl ether or ethoxyethane: CH 3 – CH 2 – O – CH 2 – CH 3
  • Ethyl propyl ether or ethoxypropane: CH 3 – CH 2 – O – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 3
  • Ethylbutyl ether or ethoxybutane : CH 3 – CH 2 – O – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 3
  • Dipropyl ether or propoxypropane: CH 3 – CH 2 – CH 2 – O – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 3
  • Propylbutyl ether or propoxybutane: CH 3 – CH 2 – CH 2 – O – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 3
  • Dibutyl ether or butoxybutane: CH 3 – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 2 – O – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 3
  • Methylphenyl ether or methoxybenzene: CH 3 – O – C 6 H 5
  • Ethylphenyl ether or ethoxybenzene: CH 3 – CH 2 – O – C 6 H 5
  • Propylphenyl ether or propoxybenzene: CH 3 – CH 2 – CH 2 – O – C 6 H 5
  • Butylphenyl ether or butoxybenzene: CH 3 – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 2 – O – C 6 H 5
  • Pentylphenyl ether or pentoxybenzene: CH 3 – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 2 – O – C 6 H 5
  • Hexylphenyl ether or hexoxybenzene: CH 3 – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 2 – CH 2 – O – C 6 H 5
  • Diphenyl ether or phenoxybenzene: C 6 H 5 – O – C 6 H 5
  • 2-methoxybutane: CH 3 – CH (- O – CH 3 ) – CH 2 – CH 3 (parenthesis indicates chain is down).
  • 2-ethoxybutane: CH 3 – CH (- O – CH 2 – CH 3 ) – CH 2 – CH 3 (parenthesis indicates chain is down).
  • 3-Methoxypentane: CH 3 – CH 2 – CH (- O – CH 3 ) – CH 2 – CH 3 (parenthesis indicates chain is down).
  • 3-ethoxypentane: CH 3 – CH 2 – CH (- O – CH 2 – CH 3 ) – CH 2 – CH 3 (parenthesis indicates chain is down).

Show More

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Check Also
Close
Back to top button